2016 Africa Workshops

African gathering

 

Rights, Development and Democracy

Saturday, Apr 16, 2016, 1:45 pm

Co-Sponsored by Africa, Eco-Justice, and Global Economic Justice Workshop Areas

Many countries have looked to the extractive industries and large-scale investment projects as economic drivers of development. But often this “development” locks out the voices the people affected, violates the rights of local communities and leaves large scars on the face of the earth. Hear stories from activists globally and in the U.S. who are opposing large scale investment projects and working for democratic solutions and a rights-based approach to development that serves God’s people and Creation.

Speakers:

  • Conrado Olivera, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)'s Joining Hands Against Hunger
  • Aniedi Okure, Africa Faith and Justice Network
  • Sister Mary Pendergast, Ecology Director for Sisters of Mercy of the Northeast
  • Gretchen Gordon, Coalition for Human Rights in Development

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The Politics of Pineapple: Impact of AGOA on African Farmers and Business

Saturday, Apr 16, 2016, 3:30 pm

Who really benefits from AGOA? This workshop will explore impact of Africa Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) on local African Farmers and business over the past 15 years. Exports from Africa have largely been oil and gas – accounting for approximately 95% of Africa export to the US. With the falling oil prices, the major export of Africa to the US, what infrastructures are put in place to address the lopsided US-Africa Trade? How do we prevent corporate dominance of local African farmers and business and tax evasion?

Speakers:

  • John A. Hosinski, Senior Program Officer, Africa Department Solidarity Center, AFL-CIO

Moderator: Fr. David Schwinghamer, MM, Maryknoll Office For Global Concerns

 

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Preying on Borrowers: Foreign Aid, Corporate Greed and Africa’s Rising Debt

Sunday, Apr 17, 2016, 2:00 pm

In July 2014, Jubilee USA reported that two hedge funds successfully sued the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) for $68 million, of which $50 million (73.53%) of the amount was interest on the loans dating back to the early 1980s.” Money lenders are crafting loopholes to prey on poor borrowers, depriving hundreds of millions around the world, especially children, of resources that could provide them the basic necessities of life. Find out how you can tackle exploitative “Foreign Aid” that contributes to impoverishing local communities in developing countries.

Speakers:

  • Eric LeCompte, Executive Director, Jubilee USA
  • Andrew Hanauer, Campaigns Director, Jubilee USA

Moderator: Aniedi Okure, OP – Executive Director, Africa Faith & Justice Network

 

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